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Stood by the failed “tax experiment” that drastically underfunded Kansas schools?

Mm hmm

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Yep

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Mm hmm

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Obviously

ANSWER: Brownback, Kobach, & Schmidt

Kobach vowed that he would reinstate Brownback’s tax cuts if elected.
 

As Attorney General, Schmidt defended the unconstitutionally low school funding that Brownback used to pay for his "tax experiment." 

Wasted taxpayer dollars promoting his own political agenda, despite it being bad for Kansans?

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Correct

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Indeed

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Duh

ANSWER: Brownback, Kobach, & Schmidt.

 

All three used their office in some capacity to promote their own political agenda, even if it was bad for Kansans.

 

Brownback tanked Kansas' economy and kept schools underfunded with his disastrous "tax experiment."

 

Kobach's "case to nowhere" that threatened to strip tens of thousands of Kansans of their right to vote got him sent back to remedial law school courses.

 

Schmidt signed on to the bogus election lawsuit despite failing to provide evidence of the widespread voter fraud he was alleging. Both resulted in making a mockery out of Kansans.

Stole from the Kansas Highway Fund that left 1,000 miles of roads neglected from maintenance, using that money to fund tax cuts for the wealthy?

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Yup

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Obviously

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Guess Again

ANSWER: Brownback & Schmidt

 

Sam Brownback stole $2 billion from the Kansas Highway Fund to pay for his “tax experiment,” leaving 1,000 miles of roads neglected. And standing right behind him through it all? Derek Schmidt, who defended this stealing of funds in court, and even twisted the logic, claiming “if you read the letter of the law... it doesn’t say there has to be a balanced budget.” 

Pursued the “case to nowhere” that sought to strip tens of thousands of Kansans of their right to vote, costing Kansans $2 million in legal fees.

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Guess Again

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Correct

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Correct

ANSWER: Kobach & Schmidt.

 

While Kobach started the “case to nowhere” that got him sent back to remedial law courses as punishment by the judge overseeing the case, Schmidt prolonged the battle that he inherited from Kobach for over five years. This tag-team cost Kansas taxpayers nearly $2 million.

Fought to discriminate against LGBTQ Kansans and outlaw gay marriage in Kansas.

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... yeah

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Uh huh.

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Of course

ANSWER: Brownback, Schmidt, & Kobach

 

Throughout his time in the state Senate, Schmidt repeatedly defined marriage as between “one man and one woman,” and sought to undermine marriage equality efforts. He even went as far as working to defending state’s rights to not recognize gay marriage as legitimate under the law.

 

Brownback and Schmidt teamed up to prevent same-sex couples from receiving marriage licenses, even after a judge directed these licenses be issued.

 

Kobach vigorously opposed gay marriage, calling it the “single most important issue” during his congressional campaign.

Traded campaign cash for political favors?

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Guilty

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Guilty

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Guilty

ANSWER: Brownback, Schmidt, & Kobach

 

As Attorney General, Schmidt used his authority to attempt to kill a proposed casino that would be a competitor to one of his largest donors. He also allowed payday lending loan rates to rise to almost 400% after taking thousands from the industry.

 

In 2013, Brownback rewarded a company whose CEO had given the maximum allowable donation to his campaign with a DCF contract.

 

In 2017, Kobach sought a pardon for the vice president of one of his corporate donors who had committed a violent crime with a firearm.

Has consistently opposed Medicaid expansion?

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Yes

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Very much yes

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Extremely yes

ANSWER: Brownback, Schmidt, & Kobach

 

A longtime opponent of Medicaid expansion, Schmidt led the effort to prevent expansion while in the state legislature, as far back as 2005.

 

In 2017, then-Governor Brownback vetoed a bill to expand Medicaid to around 150,000 Kansans, legislation which passed the Kansas House and Senate with Republican backing. As Attorney General, Schmidt joined Brownback in fighting against much-wanted Medicaid expansion.

 

Kobach firmly opposed Medicaid expansion, calling it “unrealistic and expensive.”